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Serving the Fox Valley Since 1922

Frequently Asked Questions

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How should I prepare for my visit with the doctor?
Who can I talk to about a complaint?
How can I get a copy of my medical records?
How should I prepare for a laboratory test?
Does Dreyer offer interpreting services?
Does the Clinic accept donations in honor of doctors or in memory of a patient or family member?
What is a physician assistant?
What is the difference between an MD and a DO?
Will Medicare pay for a routine yearly physical examination?


How should I prepare for my visit with the doctor?

Bring a detailed list of any new symptoms or problems that are prompting the visit, including when they started.

Bring a list of the over-the-counter medications, vitamins, or supplements (including herbal ones) that you are taking.

Jot down in advance any questions you want to ask or issues you need to have the doctor clarify.

Arrive on time.

Arrive early if your insurance requires a copayment, and please make it before you check in at the appointment desk.

To prevent any distractions to you or the doctor, please turn off your cell phone when you are in the exam room or leave your phone at home or in the car.

Please refrain from bringing food or beverages into the exam room.

Bring a friend or family member to supervise any children accompanying you while the children wait for you in the reception area.

Advise your doctor of any changes to your health history, such as weight loss or gain, modifications to diet, new exercise program, altered sleep patterns, etc.

When you leave, ask your doctor when you should be seen again.

Schedule future appointments and tests before you leave.

If you need to cancel your appointment for any reason, be sure to call so you can be rescheduled.

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Who can I talk to about a complaint?

Service excellence is Dreyer's number one priority, and there are a number of avenues available for you to share your opinions in this regard. You can always ask to speak to the supervisor of any department, area, or site when you have an experience that you feel is less than excellent. We encourage you to take this step for immediate resolution of any problem or issue.

The Clinic also surveys its patients periodically to measure how it is performing and to ascertain where improvements need to be made. Please use the space provided on the printed satisfaction survey you may receive to add your comments about staff and services.

A third avenue available to you is the Patient Advocacy Team. The Patient Advocacy Team can provide additional attention to your questions and address concerns about care or service issues that a patient or family member may have. The Patient Advocacy Team can be reached at 630-859-6754, or by visiting www.dreyermed.com/quality.

Like complaints, compliments are welcomed at Dreyer too. All the avenues mentioned above - supervisors, surveys, and the Patient Advocacy Team - are good ones for sharing your compliments about staff and services. Or, if you prefer, you can write a letter and address it to Administration at the West Downer Place site, 1877 W. Downer Pl., Aurora, IL, 60506.

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How can I get a copy of my medical records?

All requests for copies of medical records should be directed to the Release of Information area in the Medical Records Department on the lower level of Dreyer Medical Clinic's West Aurora site at 1870 West Galena Boulevard, Aurora, Illinois, 60506, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. You may also call 630-859-7266 for assistance. All requests are processed within three to five days after the appropriate completed release forms have been received.

Fees have been established for the copying of medical records in accordance with legislation enacted by the State of Illinois in September of 2001. Fees will vary depending on the volume of the records requested. Contact the Medical Records Department at 630-859-7266 to determine the exact costs for the records you need.

Click here to download an English version of the authorization form.

Click here to download a Spanish version of the authorization form.

(Adobe Acrobat Reader required.)

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How should I prepare for a laboratory test?

Many common laboratory tests require fasting, which means having nothing to eat or drink, except water, for 8-10 hours prior to your blood draw. You may take any prescribed medications at the usual times. Common tests that require fasting include:

Lipid Profile
Triglycerides
Cholesterol
Glucose
Basic Profile
Comprehensive Profile

If you have questions about a specific laboratory test, please call 630-859-6830. If you plan to utilize the services of one of our satellite laboratories for your blood draw, please call the site first to verify the hours a lab technician is available there.

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Does Dreyer offer interpreting services?

To serve a growing number of Dreyer patients, the Clinic has three full-time interpreters that are stationed in the three largest Aurora sites - West Aurora, Fox Valley Villages, and Highland. These interpreters are available to travel to other sites in most situations with advance notice. If you or a family member are Spanish-speaking only and would like the assistance of one of the interpreters during your visit at the Clinic, please notify the reception staff when you make the appointment. In addition to Spanish, Dreyer has physicians and associates fluent in twelve additional languages.

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Does the Clinic accept donations in honor of doctors or in memory of a patient or family member?

Occasionally, patients ask if the Clinic accepts any donations in honor of a particular doctor or in memory of a patient or family member. Years ago, the physicians established a special fund to receive gifts from patients and colleagues with the income redistributed to worthy not-for-profit causes. The Dreyer Community Health Fund promotes the health and well-being of the Fox Valley area by providing much-needed funding and support to health care organizations that target underserved populations. Through donations to selected free clinics, such as the Aurora Community Wellness Clinic and the Visiting Nurse Association, the Fund helps provide lifesaving prescription medications to people who could not otherwise afford them and also anti-nausea and symptom relief medications to people with cancer. The Dreyer Community Health Fund also helps provide education to health care workers and the general public concerning advances in health services, especially in the areas of disease prevention and health promotion. In addition, the Fund may sponsor research in the cause and treatment of disease as well as the delivery of health care. A fourth and newer focus for the Fund is the healing garden adjacent to the Dreyer Cancer Center. Administration of the Fund is conducted by the Advocate Charitable Foundation, with guidance from a board of local community leaders. Contributions are vital to the existence of the Dreyer Community Health Fund, and gifts are gratefully received by the Foundation, at 205 West Touhy Avenue, Suite 225, Park Ridge, Illinois, 60068.

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What is a physician assistant?

Physician Assistants (PAs) are health care professionals trained and licensed to practice medicine as delegated by and with the supervision of a physician. PAs are qualified by graduation from an accredited PA program and/or by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA). In the health care setting, a PA can take a complete health history, perform physical exams, order diagnostic tests, prescribe most medications, diagnose and treat illnesses and injuries, and provide patient education and preventive health care counseling. Along with handling most routine medical problems, PAs can do more extensive procedures that fall within their specialties. The initials PA-C after their surname means the physician assistant is certified and has passed the certification exam developed jointly by the National Board of Medical Examiners and the NCCPA.

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What is the difference between an MD and a DO?

MD stands for Medical Doctor and DO stands for Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine. Both have four years of undergraduate and four years of basic medical education. Both must pass similar state licensing exams after completing a residency. Both practice in fully accredited and licensed medical centers and hospitals. A DO has additional training in the musculoskeletal system with a greater focus on the body's interconnected system of nerves, muscles, and bones, and the root or cause of a problem. A DO uses manipulative treatment such as soft tissue techniques and massage therapy to help improve circulation and mobility and therefore promote healing. Because DOs practice a "whole person" approach to medicine, most are general practitioners. However, a DO can enter into a specialty, such as cardiology or orthopaedics, just as an MD can. Dreyer currently has ten DOs among its medical staff.

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Will Medicare pay for a routine yearly physical examination?

Medicare does not cover the cost of routine exams by your physician or any tests related to the routine physical. As of January 1, 2005, however, Medicare will cover one initial preventive physical exam in a lifetime for patients newly eligible for Medicare within the first six months of beginning their coverage. When calling Dreyer for an appointment, please let the receptionist know you want to schedule a "Welcome to Medicare exam." Medicare Part B also covers one screening mammogram per year for female beneficiaries.

Medicare generally covers items that are considered medically necessary. "Medically necessary" is defined as a service, treatment, procedure, equipment, drug, device, or supply provided by a hospital, physician, or other health care provider that is required to identify or treat a beneficiary's illness or injury. Some treatments, however, may be limited by Medicare guidelines.

The Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN) is a written notice designed to protect you from unexpected bills that you will receive if Medicare does not cover a certain service or supply. If you receive an ABN, you will need to make a decision about whether or not to receive the service or supply since you will be responsible for the charges. An ABN is not presented for services that Medicare never covers, such as a yearly exam.

As a Medicare beneficiary, it is your responsibility to keep your insurance record updated. You may do this by calling the office that coordinates benefits at 1-800-999-1118.

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